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What is the minimum amount of water and food for a 14 year old .....?

What is the minimum amount of water and food for a 14 year old .....? Topic: What is the minimum amount of water and food for a 14 year old .....?
June 20, 2019 / By Donald
Question: He had surgery last week and is thin to begin with . I think it is part rebellion and part pain. He is ready to go to the hospital for dehydration based on what he has refused to eat or drink for two days. He over-heard me and now ate 1/2 sandwich and 8 ounces of water. He may be on a roll because he does not want to go to the hospital. I do not want to drag him out if he is having enough now. WHAT AMOUNT OF H2O AND FOOD IS THE RULE?
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Best Answers: What is the minimum amount of water and food for a 14 year old .....?

Braidy Braidy | 4 days ago
Hello, In actual fact, there is no "right" answer to your question. Every person, regardless of age, has different metabolic rates, different lifestyles, different amounts of exercise or sedentary activity, different reactions to stress or trauma (such as surgery), and different methods they employ to deal with changes in their lives. Certainly, your 14-year-old should be drinking enough fluids (preferably plain water, perhaps sports drinks or herbal teas, milk, juice - but NOT soda which actually dehydrates you more, and NOT caffeine which can suppress appetite) to keep an adequate fluid balance. He or you can tell this at home by checking the color and smell of his urine. If a person is dehydrated, their urine is darker, less in amount than normal, and has a stronger smell. If he's barely urinating at all, then by all means get him to the doctor or hospital immediately so he does not run the risk of cardiovascular collapse or damage to his kidneys, heart or brain from inadequate blood volume. As far as the "normal" amount of food a 14-year-old boy needs, that depends on the boy himself. Certainly, at that age, he is still growing and growing up, so needs enough "fuel" to run his body and supply calories and nutrients to help him grow. This does NOT mean a diet of junk food, candy, pizza, soda or other "empty" foods. Too much fat and starch can help him gain weight, but not necessarily in a healthy way, and can eventually cause obesity. A diet rich in protiens, fruits, vegetables, fiber, essential amino acids and vitamins, grains, nuts and, if he eats meat, preferably poultry or fish (or VERY lean cuts of beef or pork) should give a growing boy enough to stay healthy. I think the most important part of your question is WHY he's not eating or drinking. I don't know what kind of surgery he had, but some, and/or any medications he may have to take afterward, can cause GI upset and reduce the desire for food or liquids. Also, recovering from the trauma of surgery can cause psychological difficulty for some people. Your theory that "rebellion" could be playing a part is accurate, but then the question becomes, "What is he rebelling against?". Is he angry at himself, at you, at the doctor, at his body's "failure" by requiring being "fixed", does he feel he has failed himself or someone else? My best advice would be to encourage, but not argue with him about his oral intake, since if it is part of a power struggle, arguing or pleading will just make him more entrenched. If this behavior continues, I would strongly encourage you to consult with his primary care physician for a complete exam with necessary blood, urine, and GI studies. If these come back normal, then you're probably looking at a psychological problem, such as depression, anger, anxiety, trauma, etc., and your doctor should be able to recommend a qualified counselor and/or psychiatrist for further consultation and assistance. Boys can develop anorexia, though it's more common in girls, so that possibility cannot be overlooked. I hope your son (I'm assuming that) recovers well from his surgery, and can get back on track with his food and fluid intake soon, since not doing so could endanger his current and future health. Good luck to you both.
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Braidy Originally Answered: What is the minimum amount of water and food for a 14 year old .....?
Hello, In actual fact, there is no "right" answer to your question. Every person, regardless of age, has different metabolic rates, different lifestyles, different amounts of exercise or sedentary activity, different reactions to stress or trauma (such as surgery), and different methods they employ to deal with changes in their lives. Certainly, your 14-year-old should be drinking enough fluids (preferably plain water, perhaps sports drinks or herbal teas, milk, juice - but NOT soda which actually dehydrates you more, and NOT caffeine which can suppress appetite) to keep an adequate fluid balance. He or you can tell this at home by checking the color and smell of his urine. If a person is dehydrated, their urine is darker, less in amount than normal, and has a stronger smell. If he's barely urinating at all, then by all means get him to the doctor or hospital immediately so he does not run the risk of cardiovascular collapse or damage to his kidneys, heart or brain from inadequate blood volume. As far as the "normal" amount of food a 14-year-old boy needs, that depends on the boy himself. Certainly, at that age, he is still growing and growing up, so needs enough "fuel" to run his body and supply calories and nutrients to help him grow. This does NOT mean a diet of junk food, candy, pizza, soda or other "empty" foods. Too much fat and starch can help him gain weight, but not necessarily in a healthy way, and can eventually cause obesity. A diet rich in protiens, fruits, vegetables, fiber, essential amino acids and vitamins, grains, nuts and, if he eats meat, preferably poultry or fish (or VERY lean cuts of beef or pork) should give a growing boy enough to stay healthy. I think the most important part of your question is WHY he's not eating or drinking. I don't know what kind of surgery he had, but some, and/or any medications he may have to take afterward, can cause GI upset and reduce the desire for food or liquids. Also, recovering from the trauma of surgery can cause psychological difficulty for some people. Your theory that "rebellion" could be playing a part is accurate, but then the question becomes, "What is he rebelling against?". Is he angry at himself, at you, at the doctor, at his body's "failure" by requiring being "fixed", does he feel he has failed himself or someone else? My best advice would be to encourage, but not argue with him about his oral intake, since if it is part of a power struggle, arguing or pleading will just make him more entrenched. If this behavior continues, I would strongly encourage you to consult with his primary care physician for a complete exam with necessary blood, urine, and GI studies. If these come back normal, then you're probably looking at a psychological problem, such as depression, anger, anxiety, trauma, etc., and your doctor should be able to recommend a qualified counselor and/or psychiatrist for further consultation and assistance. Boys can develop anorexia, though it's more common in girls, so that possibility cannot be overlooked. I hope your son (I'm assuming that) recovers well from his surgery, and can get back on track with his food and fluid intake soon, since not doing so could endanger his current and future health. Good luck to you both.
Braidy Originally Answered: What is the minimum amount of water and food for a 14 year old .....?
I personally do not recommend a ferret as a pet for a child (or young teen). They require a lot of care and attention - and lots of cleaning. They poop a LOT. And it's not nice little pellets like rabbits make. You say that you can spend the time now, but think - what will taking 2 hours out of your day do later on when you are in high school, doing club things and sports, and hanging out with friends? Ferrets can live for 7-9 years on average. When and if you go to college, you will probably have to leave your pet at home for your parents to care for. Is this something they would be okay with? They can also get to be very expensive. Cage, bedding, food, toys, veterinary care, etc. can really add up quickly. Have you considered ferret-proofing? They can get into anything and everything - inside and under the smallest bits you never imagined. They can foil upholstered furniture, squeeze under the fridge, find holes in your cabinetry... Don't get me wrong, ferrets are wonderful creatures - the silliest, most fun-loving animals on the planet. They make great pets, but not for people who can't take the responsibility, or can't handle the stress of such needy animals.

Adison Adison
I personally do not recommend a ferret as a pet for a child (or young teen). They require a lot of care and attention - and lots of cleaning. They poop a LOT. And it's not nice little pellets like rabbits make. You say that you can spend the time now, but think - what will taking 2 hours out of your day do later on when you are in high school, doing club things and sports, and hanging out with friends? Ferrets can live for 7-9 years on average. When and if you go to college, you will probably have to leave your pet at home for your parents to care for. Is this something they would be okay with? They can also get to be very expensive. Cage, bedding, food, toys, veterinary care, etc. can really add up quickly. Have you considered ferret-proofing? They can get into anything and everything - inside and under the smallest bits you never imagined. They can foil upholstered furniture, squeeze under the fridge, find holes in your cabinetry... Don't get me wrong, ferrets are wonderful creatures - the silliest, most fun-loving animals on the planet. They make great pets, but not for people who can't take the responsibility, or can't handle the stress of such needy animals.
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Stephanie Stephanie
First, you should call your pediatrician, and ask them their opinion on his refusal to eat. If it is rebellion, that you think is a factor in him not eating, then you should try threatening to take him to the hospital, and putting him on an IV. That should give him some motivation to eat. You should follow doctors orders, and go by your own judgement. He probably should be eating three square meals a day, by now, since its been a week since his surgery. It is also very important that he say hydrated, even if he doesnt eat.
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Stephanie Originally Answered: How much water is too much? And how do I figure out the right amount of salt?
Please see "MayoClinic Article on Water" source link below. The following healthy living recommendations will help you if you’re trying to lose weight, tone up your muscles, have aspirations of building lean muscle mass, are attempting to get a wash board stomach, or just want to feel better: *1) Burn more calories then you're consuming everyday and measure your results using the following formula: Calories Consumed minus Basal Metabolic Rate (BMR) minus Physical Activity minus the Thermic Effect of Food (TEF). A website that explains this formula in more detail and will help you determine how many calories you need to reach or maintain a certain weight is at http://www.primusweb.com/fitnesspartner/... Get an online, desktop, or cell phone diet and fitness calculator. This will allow you to easily calculate the above formula, set goals, log your daily calorie consumption, and register your physical activities. Set realistic goals for your ideal body weight. Here are two websites that will calculate a suggested body weight: Adults: http://www.halls.md/ideal-weight/body.ht... Teens/Children: http://www.kidshealth.org/kid/exercise/w... It is difficult and unhealthy to lose more than one or two pounds per week. There are 3,500 calories in a pound. If you eat 500 fewer calories per day for a week you will lose one pound. If you burn through exercise 500 more calories per day for a week you will lose one pound. Here are two articles on how to break through a weight loss plateau: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/86/99147.htm http://www.webmd.com/content/pages/18/102117.htm *2) Eat natural and organic foods found on earth versus something created by a corporation to make money. Eat meals in small portions throughout the day and take a good multi-vitamin supplement. Do not try fad diets or diet pills. Avoid “High Glycemic Load Carbs” (sugar, pastries, desserts, refined starches such as breads, pasta, refined grains like white rice; high starch vegetables such as potatoes) and drink lots of water. Read this article for more information on high GL Carbs: http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/carbohydrates.html The following are food pyramids and several articles on what you should eat everyday: Food Pyramids: http://www.rayandterry.com/html/images/PyramidLRG.gif?osCsid=26a424be471d1337e7c2f105d5c64d9d http://www.mypyramid.gov/ Antioxidant Superstars - Vegetables and Beans: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/104/107638.html Antioxidant Loaded Fruits: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/104/107640.html Good Carbs Mean Better Weight: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/100/105783.htm The Benefits of Protein: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/85/98824.htm Some Fats Are Good For You: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/49/40075.htm Antioxidants in Green and Black Tea: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/104/107641.html What You Should Eat Daily: http://www.oprah.com/health/yourbody/slide/slide_yourbody_healthfood_201.jhtml Best Foods to Fight off Disease and Keep You Healthy: http://www.oprah.com/health/yourbody/slide/slide_yourbody_healthfood_101.jhtml *3) Perform cardiovascular, core, and/or strength training on most days. Read a book or find a certified trainer to make sure you're doing all exercises correctly. The following is a website and numerous articles on cardiovascular, core, and strength training: Exercise Prescription on the Net http://www.exrx.net/ Starting an Exercise Program: http://www.primusweb.com/fitnesspartner/library/activity/startexercise.htm Strength Training Basics: http://www.primusweb.com/fitnesspartner/library/activity/trainbasics.htm Cardiovascular Machine Workouts: http://www.primusweb.com/fitnesspartner/library/activity/cardiowork.htm Balance Your Way to a Stronger Body: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/64/72314.htm Understanding Your Training Heart Rate: http://www.primusweb.com/fitnesspartner/library/activity/thr.htm Exercise Errors: http://www.primusweb.com/fitnesspartner/library/activity/errors.htm Getting a Flat Stomach: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/71/81365.htm Weight Lifting - Does Order Matter: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/80/96440.htm Encouraging Exercise in Your Kids: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/95/103524.htm Strength Training Safe and Effective for Kids: http://www.webmd.com/content/article/32/1728_81005.htm *4) Get plenty of sleep. Sleep experts say most adults need between seven and nine hours of sleep each night for optimum performance, health, and safety. *5) Educate yourself continually on health issues and make a life long commitment to good health. A great free publication is “Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005”. A reputable test you can take to measure your biological age is at http://realage.com Look at all areas where you can enhance your health. For example, make improvements in the quality of the air you breathe. Review outdoor air quality forecasts where you live and get an indoor air purifier. Send me an email or yahoo instant message to "gainbetterhealth" if you have any questions and good luck! *Click on all the source links below to get the full benefit of the recommendations. The answers presented to your health questions are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health providers with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.

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