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How much does it cost to maintain a fish...?

How much does it cost to maintain a fish...? Topic: How much does it cost to maintain a fish...?
June 16, 2019 / By Meriel
Question: and what is the cost for everything? aka. fish food. a fishbowl. a plant for the bowl. and of course.. the actual fish :] **alsoooo same question but for a frog
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Best Answers: How much does it cost to maintain a fish...?

Leonora Leonora | 3 days ago
It really depends on what fish you want to keep, and how much bargain shopping you're willing to do. Purchasing the correct tank set-up for your fish is the expensive part. Like many other contained pets (birds/ferrets/etc), the "cage" often costs a fair bit in comparison to the animal. Unlike many other pets however, you most likely won't have any vet bills. (Some people DO get surgery on large fish, but I am not one of them.) The good news is: sometimes you can find used tanks and equipment for cheap (even free) at yardsales, auctions, forums, craigslist, etc. Bigger tanks cost more up front, but are easier to keep stable, have more species choice available, and potentially have a better cost per gallon ratio (up to about 50 gallons or so). Minimum cost ratio for a proper 5 gallon aquarium with all new store bought equipment can run over $10 per gallon (with my fish choices limited to only a few select species), but I could set up a 50 gallon for less than $10 per gallon (with a rather large array of choice). It's also much easier to find cheap equipment for mid-sized tanks in my experience. In terms of the maintenance costs: you'll have to replace filter inserts when they start to fall apart, water (25% of the water should be changed per week), and food which varies in price depending on how varied a diet you want to provide. Buy small containers...fish food loses nutritional value after being exposed to air, and should be discarded every 3-6 months. Occasional expenses include medications, hood light bulbs, and replacing worn-out/broken equipment.
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Leonora Originally Answered: How much does it cost to maintain a fish...?
It really depends on what fish you want to keep, and how much bargain shopping you're willing to do. Purchasing the correct tank set-up for your fish is the expensive part. Like many other contained pets (birds/ferrets/etc), the "cage" often costs a fair bit in comparison to the animal. Unlike many other pets however, you most likely won't have any vet bills. (Some people DO get surgery on large fish, but I am not one of them.) The good news is: sometimes you can find used tanks and equipment for cheap (even free) at yardsales, auctions, forums, craigslist, etc. Bigger tanks cost more up front, but are easier to keep stable, have more species choice available, and potentially have a better cost per gallon ratio (up to about 50 gallons or so). Minimum cost ratio for a proper 5 gallon aquarium with all new store bought equipment can run over $10 per gallon (with my fish choices limited to only a few select species), but I could set up a 50 gallon for less than $10 per gallon (with a rather large array of choice). It's also much easier to find cheap equipment for mid-sized tanks in my experience. In terms of the maintenance costs: you'll have to replace filter inserts when they start to fall apart, water (25% of the water should be changed per week), and food which varies in price depending on how varied a diet you want to provide. Buy small containers...fish food loses nutritional value after being exposed to air, and should be discarded every 3-6 months. Occasional expenses include medications, hood light bulbs, and replacing worn-out/broken equipment.

Jordie Jordie
The fish itself will be pretty inexpensive. I know you didn't ask about bettas but my betta was only $4. However, I just wanted to let you know that even though the fish is not much money, there are other expenses involved too that you have to consider. I just bought my male betta a few days ago from a pet store... I was expecting to pay less than $10 for the whole shebang, but I have learned a lot in the past 4 days. My little fish is a bit (not a lot, but a bit) more work than I thought he would be. I thought I could just put him in a tiny 1/2 gallon $10 betta cube and clean it out once a week and that was that! Little did I know he should be in a heated, filtered, larger tank. I didn't know he should get a variety of foods. I didn't know you shoudn't change all the water every week. I didn't know you needed dechlorinating drops... I now have my little guy in a 2 gallon filtered tank with some live pothos plants, colored rocks, and a little wall to hide behind. I am not currently heating his tank but the light keeps his tank a little warmer during the day - it's at 76 degrees right now. I plan to change 25% of his water once a week and suction the stones clean. Here is what I paid at the petstore: $4 - betta fish $35 - 2 gallon tank with cover, light, and filter $7 - small gravel vaccuum tube $2 - stick-on thermometer $7 - wall for him to hide behind $5 - colored stones $2 - bio gold betta food $3 - frozen bloodworms $3 - decholorinating drops $0 - pothos plant (I already had this. A similar plant in a pet store is $5) Also - it would be nice to have a small heater ($10-$25) and a thing to monitor the ph and ammonia in the water - but I don't have these (yet). Again - I am no expert!! But this is what I've done so far. Hope it helps!
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Georgeanna Georgeanna
Forget the whole bowl thing. It may seem like a cheap way to get into fish keeping, but having to buy new fish all the time after you kill them gets old quick. Now I can understand you not having a heap of $$ to spend, so I second the suggestion of looking for some 2nd hand gear. Used fish tanks are cheap, heck you might even luck into a whole running setup that someone doesn't want any more. You can probably get a usefull 20 gal tank for less than one of those 2 gallon toy setups cost new. You can of course spend a LOT of money. I'm budgeting about $500 for my new setup, and that is with the fish AND the actual glass tank being free and DIY most of the other stuff. To keep a FREE fish. :-) Good luck, do your research and get a decent aquarium, things will go MCUH better. Ian
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Delinda Delinda
I also have a 29 gallon tank. I just started to have tropical fish today and I'm going to get a heater soon. It shouldn't cost too much. The bill should be around the price of operating a light bulb.
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Bunny Bunny
It really depends on what you're looking for. If you just want a goldfish or betta, you could spend around $4 on food, $10 on a small bowl, $25 on the necessary water chemicals, $10 on a fake plant and gravel, and the price of fish varies depending on species, but bettas and goldfish usually go for around $5 to $10.
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Bunny Originally Answered: FISH my fish is doing flips and summer-salts and acting weird and I do not know what to do its like its?
Okay well it can be many things wrong with you're fish it can be stressed or It may have Swim Bladder Disease. Do a quick Google on the disease and there should be meds you can try. Swim Bladder Disorder is an extremely common fish ailment, and it typically looks worse than it actually is. I know, you're probably sitting there watching your poor fish flop around, struggling valiantly to make it to the top for air, and basically looking nothing like his usual graceful self, and thinking to yourself, "This is it, I'm going to lose him." Let me make you feel a little better before I get into all the details - Swim bladder problems are not contagious, they don't seem to be painful, they are generally easy to treat, and they are usually not even close to fatal. Feel better? Good, let's get on to the fun stuff. Symptoms can include: Either floats uncontrollably to the top of the tank, or sinks to the bottom. Seems to struggle greatly while swimming, and often will swim at an unusual angle. May or may not have a "kinked" spine, often in the shape of an "S" when viewed from above. May lie around, barely moving except when a mad dash is made to the surface for air. May or may not have a swollen belly, often caused by constipation Swim Bladder Disorder Treatment Swim Bladder Disorder can be caused by several things, and it's best to try to figure out the cause of the problem because the cause will determine what treatment you will want to use. As always, I recommend isolating the ill fish for treatment if you have him/her in a community tank. While Swim Bladder Disorder isn't contagious, isolating the fish will make monitoring and treating the condition much easier on you (and will give the sick fish much needed "quiet time" to recover). If your fish is having a hard time getting to the surface for air, it is often a good idea to lower the water level to make things easier on him. Just remember if you do this that you have much less water volume than before and water changes must be increased to keep him in good health. Below is a list of things that can cause Swim Bladder Disorder, in order from most common to rarest. Constipation - Constipation is the number one cause of Swim Bladder Disorder in otherwise healthy fish. If your fish is showing symptoms of Swim Bladder Disorder, I always suggest treating the fish as if he has constipation first, because they usually do (click on the underlined "constipation" for treatment information). Overfeeding - If your fish is displaying symptoms of Swim Bladder Disorder immediately after feedings, and the symptoms tend to go away after a few hours, you are probably overfeeding. It is helpful to remember that fish only have stomachs approximately the size of one eye, so try to feed smaller meals several times a day instead of one giant meal once a day. That is the treatment for Swim Bladder Disorder caused by overfeeding in a nutshell, not too hard, eh? Injury - Sometimes fish who have recently been through a traumatic experience (being dropped on the floor, being in a physical fight with another fish, etc) may display Swim Bladder Disorder symptoms. In these cases, many times there is permanent damage to the swim bladder. Unfortunately this means that there is no real cure for the disorder if it is caused by injury, but you can manage the illness. Often fish permanent swim bladder problems can live normal, healthy lives if accomodations are made - such as keeping the water level lower than normal to allow for easier access to air, or providing large-leaved plants near the water surface to make a "lounging" spot where launching off for air is more doable for the fish. Swim bladder problems are not painful and are generally not fatal in the case of injury, so these guys have a wonderful prognosis in general. Birth Defects - This is one of those rare and yet common causes. If you are a fish breeder, it is extremely common to get some fry with congenital swim bladder problems. If you are someone that "collects" fish from petstores, it would be extremely rare to find a fish whose swim bladder problems are caused by birth defects as usually wholesalers that supply the fish will destroy fish with birth defects before they ever make it to the store. As in the case of injury, birth defects are really not curable but they can be managed so that the fish can live normal, happy lives...if less graceful lives than non-damaged fish.

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