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My friend's grandpa got diagnosed with Pancreas cancer and I want to know more about it?

My friend's grandpa got diagnosed with Pancreas cancer and I want to know more about it? Topic: My friend's grandpa got diagnosed with Pancreas cancer and I want to know more about it?
April 24, 2019 / By Bettie
Question: Some statistics would be nice. Like how many people actually survive from it, stuff like that. For those who said I was lazy and crap that that, shut up. I did look it up, and I found a whole bunch of useless information.
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Best Answers: My friend's grandpa got diagnosed with Pancreas cancer and I want to know more about it?

Aideen Aideen | 8 days ago
Survival Rates According to the American Cancer Society, for all stages of pancreatic cancer combined, the one-year relative survival rate is 20%, and the five-year rate is 4%. These low survival rates are attributable to the fact that fewer than 10% of patients' tumors are confined to the pancreas at the time of diagnosis; in most cases, the malignancy has already progressed to the point where surgical removal is impossible. In those cases where resection can be performed, the average survival rate is 18 to 20 months. The overall five-year survival rate is about 10%, although this can rise as high as 20% to 25% if the tumor is removed completely and when cancer has not spread to lymph nodes. Tumor Size Tumor size does appear to impact survival rates. The larger the tumor, the less likely it is to be cured by resection. However, even large tumors may be removed and a number of patients with tumors greater than 4-5 cm appear to have been cured by surgery. There is increasing evidence that the best pancreatic cancer outcomes are achieved at major medical centers with extensive experience -- those that perform more than 20 Whipple procedures annually. Progression In patients where a cure is not possible, progression of the disease may be accompanied by progressive weakness, weight loss, and pain. Effective techniques for pain management are widely available today and used by physicians experienced in the care of pancreatic cancer patients. The techniques include nerve blocks and various drugs that can be taken by mouth or injection. There are also a variety of effective techniques available to treat bile duct obstruction which may produce jaundice and stomach obstruction caused by growth of the tumor. Both surgical and non-surgical techniques may be effective. There is increasing evidence that the best pancreatic cancer outcomes are achieved at major medical centers with extensive experience -- those that perform more than 20 Whipple procedures annually.
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Aideen Originally Answered: Pancreas problems. My sister had most of her pancreas removed, cancer..?
My mother died of pancreatic cancer, so I have an idea of what your sister is going through. It's a miserable, miserable state to live in, even when they do manage to remove the tumor. Pancreatic tumors have a VERY nasty tendency to grow back and spread quickly, so that should be something the doctor should explore asap. If she is dissatisfied with this doctor, find a new one and quickly. Too many of them automatically write off a pancreatic cancer patient and do bare minimum to treat them. Try a university hospital, but stay away from Sloan-Kettering. Your sister might benefit from seeing an acupuncturist who also practices Chinese medicine. through the acupuncture, diet modification and Chinese herbs she may be able to get some relief and resolve her symptoms. It may not be a cure, but I know from personal experience that it will help.

Tiras Tiras
Well as another person said google it that can be helpful. I am an Rn and have cared for Pancreatic CA patients. There are different stages of cancer stage 1 through 4. The prognosis depends on the stage. Pancreatic CA is not easy to get ride of though. chemotherapy and radiation therapy can be used to help shrink the cancer or some times surgery to remove a portion of the pancreas is done. Unfortunately I can not give you statistics but I hope that your friends Grandfather pulls through.
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Randall Randall
Sorry to hear about it. My god-mother had pancreas cancer and died from it. There's like an 85% smoking and alcohol will worsen it, so tell him to stay away from them for a while. He should rest often, but also have some exercise as walking 30 minutes a day will help your body gain endurance for the long struggle ahead. You can find out more information about this at http://www.cancer-info.com/pancreas.htm.
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Marshall Marshall
Below are 2 good websites, the first is an encyclopaedia entry which gives details, science and statistics. The 2nd is a cancer website. Both pages focus on Pancreatic Cancer.
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Jeshaiah Jeshaiah
I hate pancreatic cancer - it took my grandma in 2004. It is not a death sentence, but fairly close to it. Very very difficult type of cancer. Most people who get diagnosed with it are gone in less than a year. Few survive until 5 years, but there are some cases of folks that have survived it. Good luck to your friends Grandfather. Try to be there for your friend in terms of coping with her grandfather's cancer, rather than boostering her hopes that he will be cured. When my grandma was sick (she only made it 3 months after diagnosis), I found it most difficult to talk to people who tried to get me to hope that she would get better, because I knew how extremely unlikely that was to happen.
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Gladwyn Gladwyn
What you can tell him is I'm here for you and if you need anything, just ask. And then just ask him things like, how are you feeling? Ask him if he handling the news ok or does he need to talk or vent about it, and most of all just listen, always call him back if you miss his call. Ask him if he has little things he needs like razors, soap that he likes to use and send him a care package. Ask him whose been coming to visit and if hes eating and sleeping well. Ask him what the test results were? Its not easy when a friend is sick and its hard on everyone. As far as you, how are you handling it and are you going to be able to commit to staying in touch so he knows he still has you as a friend? If you are, then all you can do is just be there for him, stay in touch and go for a visit if you can. My best to you!
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Dorian Dorian
it is a nasty one, fast. only a few are operable. By the time it is diagnosed, in the worst cases, the person may only have about 6 months. it can be stopped by chemo and radiation. No idea what the survival rate is. I'm sorry.
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Dorian Originally Answered: A friend of mine was just diagnosed with cancer.
Although you are being very sweet you really should not consider her cancer inoperable and terminal unless she plans on having no treatment at all. You would be surprised at how many survivors of stage IV cancer are around. You do not mention the type of cancer that this lady has or her age or overall health . .all these things are factored in to survival. We also learned from our own journey with cancer that inoperable does not always mean inoperable. We were told three times that our sons cancer was inoperable but he ended up having three major surgeries . .one experimental that put him into remission for 9 months. So . .don't give up on this lady just yet . . . support and encourage her fully. Here are a few things you can do to help her . . . offer to cook meals once a week for a year. Offer to have her house cleaned or her yard taken care of for a year. Offer to drive her to her treatment sessions should she decide to undergo treatment. What this lady needs is to be able to concentrate on fighting her cancer . . so alleviate concerns about her house, meals, transportation, chores . . and if possible . . any bills she might encounter. Organize a committee to plan an auction or dinner to benefit her . . the money can be used to take a trip or do something special or whatever she needs it for. If she has any wishes she may be interested in contacting Fairy Godmother Foundation for adults: http://www.fairygodmother.org/ Sometimes the only thing needed is someone to talk normally with . . your friend may not wish to dwell on her disease and might just want to be able to talk to someone about normal every day things. Keep that in mind. I am sure she will appreciate whatever you plan. Good luck.

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