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I have a questions about dermatitis in dogs?

I have a questions about dermatitis in dogs? Topic: I have a questions about dermatitis in dogs?
April 19, 2019 / By Annamaria
Question: Hello dog section! My boyfriend's mom has 2 rescued dogs, both a mixture of lhasa apso. One is about 5 (Nicky) and one is around 3(Jack). She does not know their exact age, since they were both rescued. When they got Jack, about 2 yrs or so, he was in horrible condition. He had fleas, his eyes were runny really bad, very skinny. She brought him home as a foster dog, but fell in love him the second he walked through the door. (fleas and all). She fixed him all up, but realized he was always chewing on his paws, to the point where they were red. The vets found a few allergies and he has been on medication ever since. Well, 1 year later, he got these bumps on his back. She has been in and out of the vets office every other week/month and they finally said he was allergic to ckn, beef, turkey-She had him on a diet of prescribed dog food, i believe made out of rabbit (?) and she also fed him one egg a day for the protein, and sometimes fish. She also feeds Nicky the same. They were both doing great for a while. Even the red stuff around their eyes cleared up. But Jack's bumps came back. Now the vets say it's Dermatits. They said it was not contagious for the Nicky, but just this week Nicky got it as well! She said she will not give them an egg anymore, but we don't think that is the cause. She just wants her dogs to be comfortable, as they can get itcy and infected. What should she be doing? Feeding? Thank you very much do we ask the vet to refer one to us? Also, are there pet dermatologists? Nicky has never had this issue. It just appeared last week. They are bumps filled with puss (poor babies). I do think the vet did a scrape, and i know when she goes they "pop" them...but i'm not 100% sure of what else they have done or what medication they have been on. How do i find a pet dermatologist? I know she will want to see one they have always been bathed with oatmeal shampoo!
Best Answer

Best Answers: I have a questions about dermatitis in dogs?

Woodrow Woodrow | 2 days ago
Well, dermatitis is just a generic term meaning 'inflammation of the skin', so it doesn't really count as a diagnosis. Of course the real question is what is causing the dermatitis. What sort of medication did they give, and is he still on it? Did it seem to help when he first started it? Rabbit/potato is one of the standard one-protein/one-carb diets, so that is likely to be what he was on. However, she sort of screwed up the diet trial by feeding the egg and fish. The idea is to feed absolutely nothing other than that diet (I do know how hard that is, having been through it with a very uncooperative cat). Egg and fish could be potential allergens. I hate to tell her that if she had blood drawn for an allergy test and that's how they got the 'chicken/beef/turkey' as allergens, that blood test is notoriously inaccurate. The diet trial is the only way to determine if food ingredients are a problem, and then you challenge that diet (after they look good) with one food ingredient at a time, in order to determine what it is that is causing the reaction. They also cannot have flavored medications (for example, chewable Heartgard), rawhides, treats of any kind, or even flavored Nylabones, as these can interfere. Even the flavored Heartgard has just enough beef flavoring that if a dog is allergic to beef, it will react to it. Beef, chicken, corn, wheat, and soy are the top 5, but egg, dairy, fish, and other proteins are possible allergens as well. Do his bumps show up at certain times each year? Many dogs that are allergic to pollens will flare up in fall, spring, or summer (or all of the above) but do better in winter, for example. Of course, that would not be contagious, so the other real question is why Nicky has gotten these bumps. I assume the vets did skin scrapes for mites? Sarcoptes is very contagious, although it would not have gone away without treatment. Has Nicky ever had any itchiness? Licking/scooting/scratching/etc? Or are the bumps for him totally new? Off the top of my head I'm a bit stumped for that. Is there a veterinary dermatologist in her area? I know that's more time and expense, but they are excellent at getting to the root of the problem. (At least my doctor is!) If that would be possible, it may be worth it. Poor fellows. If the food did help, (and btw many dogs are allergic to both food and pollen or dust mites for example), I would stick to it for now, but be very strict! Nothing else, no treats or people food, other than that food, for now and see if they clear up. If not, or if he/they only clear up partially, they may have inhalant allergies. There are several antihistamines that may help, a couple OTC (besides Benadryl!) and at least one prescription (doxepin, for example), so that could be an option. The other option (and best managed by a dermatologist) would be a blood test to determine what he/they is/are allergic to (for example, bermuda grass, elm, dust mites) and then they could start allergy shots, very similar to what people do. added: absolutely yes there are veterinary dermatologists. Here's the link to the American College of Veterinary Dermatologists (it's a recognized specialty by the AVMA, our vet is board-certified): http://www.acvd.org/ It tells some general info and on the left side of the home page is a link to 'Find a Dermatologist'. Some take any appointments, many are referral-only and so her vet would need to refer her to those. If it isn't allergies, the dermatologist would still be best able to diagnose any other underlying problems. Very best wishes to Nicky and Jack!
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Woodrow Originally Answered: I have a questions about dermatitis in dogs?
Well, dermatitis is just a generic term meaning 'inflammation of the skin', so it doesn't really count as a diagnosis. Of course the real question is what is causing the dermatitis. What sort of medication did they give, and is he still on it? Did it seem to help when he first started it? Rabbit/potato is one of the standard one-protein/one-carb diets, so that is likely to be what he was on. However, she sort of screwed up the diet trial by feeding the egg and fish. The idea is to feed absolutely nothing other than that diet (I do know how hard that is, having been through it with a very uncooperative cat). Egg and fish could be potential allergens. I hate to tell her that if she had blood drawn for an allergy test and that's how they got the 'chicken/beef/turkey' as allergens, that blood test is notoriously inaccurate. The diet trial is the only way to determine if food ingredients are a problem, and then you challenge that diet (after they look good) with one food ingredient at a time, in order to determine what it is that is causing the reaction. They also cannot have flavored medications (for example, chewable Heartgard), rawhides, treats of any kind, or even flavored Nylabones, as these can interfere. Even the flavored Heartgard has just enough beef flavoring that if a dog is allergic to beef, it will react to it. Beef, chicken, corn, wheat, and soy are the top 5, but egg, dairy, fish, and other proteins are possible allergens as well. Do his bumps show up at certain times each year? Many dogs that are allergic to pollens will flare up in fall, spring, or summer (or all of the above) but do better in winter, for example. Of course, that would not be contagious, so the other real question is why Nicky has gotten these bumps. I assume the vets did skin scrapes for mites? Sarcoptes is very contagious, although it would not have gone away without treatment. Has Nicky ever had any itchiness? Licking/scooting/scratching/etc? Or are the bumps for him totally new? Off the top of my head I'm a bit stumped for that. Is there a veterinary dermatologist in her area? I know that's more time and expense, but they are excellent at getting to the root of the problem. (At least my doctor is!) If that would be possible, it may be worth it. Poor fellows. If the food did help, (and btw many dogs are allergic to both food and pollen or dust mites for example), I would stick to it for now, but be very strict! Nothing else, no treats or people food, other than that food, for now and see if they clear up. If not, or if he/they only clear up partially, they may have inhalant allergies. There are several antihistamines that may help, a couple OTC (besides Benadryl!) and at least one prescription (doxepin, for example), so that could be an option. The other option (and best managed by a dermatologist) would be a blood test to determine what he/they is/are allergic to (for example, bermuda grass, elm, dust mites) and then they could start allergy shots, very similar to what people do. added: absolutely yes there are veterinary dermatologists. Here's the link to the American College of Veterinary Dermatologists (it's a recognized specialty by the AVMA, our vet is board-certified): http://www.acvd.org/ It tells some general info and on the left side of the home page is a link to 'Find a Dermatologist'. Some take any appointments, many are referral-only and so her vet would need to refer her to those. If it isn't allergies, the dermatologist would still be best able to diagnose any other underlying problems. Very best wishes to Nicky and Jack!

Shaquille Shaquille
It sounds really like the dogs have severe allergies. Have they ever been tested for allergens? They may need allergy injections to stabilize their conditions (which requires they be tested for specific allergens). If it improved significantly with food, chances are that it was mainly a food allergy. Rabbit food (IVS probably) is a common food prescribed for dogs with allergies. I suggest cutting out the egg, unless this was indicated by your vet. And do not give ANYTHING else. (no treats, etc. Once they have the allergies under control you can try to incorporate prescription hypoallergenic treats). There are other prescription foods that the owner can try if she isn't having success with the one she's on. They could also have a combination of food allergy and environmental allergies, which may be why they get better with food, but then encountered some environmental allergen (or perhaps they snuck a piece of random food from someone/somewhere). Dermatitis is not contagious. Basically, it's a skin infection, usually secondary to itching. It's imperative that in allergic dogs, you are VERY diligent with flea control, and may require applying every 2.5-3 weeks instead of 4 in the summers. It is always possible that besides their allergies, they have another skin condition on top of this (like mange) but i'm sure the vet tested them for mange before beginning treatment of allergies. Allergic dogs can be really difficult to get their conditions under control. I suggest that if she can't get it under control through food alone and such, she ask to be referred to a derm specialist. Good luck! I just read your added details. Yes, there are absolutely pet dermatologists. You can ask your vet to refer you to one in your area. You may not even need a referall, but it's probably best that you get one. The vet can transfer pet history to the derm vet. As far, as the one dog just getting dermatitis for the first time, this is not uncommon. Dogs can develop allergies (just as people do) that they didn't previously have. Perhaps fleas are worse now (in summer in most places this is the case) and they both have a flea allergic dermatitis. Like I said before, tell the owner to be very diligent about only feeding prescribed food and about flea control. If they're still having problems, it's worth seeing a dermatologist.
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Nickolas Nickolas
Am having the same problem with my spaniel....he's been going to the vet's from almost an year now and yet his skin is not improving....we've done countless tests and scrapings....sometimes it's mange, sometimes fungal infections, and now the vet suspects ticks dermatitis. So we are going to treat him for ticks first and then see if the skin condition improves. He's had several ivermectin shots and several other injections and baths as well...and he's on regular nutrition supplements....I suggest you keep consulting different vets if you are not happy with your current vet and keep up a good diet of the dogs....I have another dog but he never contracted any infection from the spaniel and they live together most of the time except that they sleep in different rooms....I just started bathing him with an oatmeal shampoo starting today and his itchiness seems a bit better after the bath but his skin is all red....good luck with the dogs; our vet did recommend us to a dermatologist recently, and we're gonna go for the blood reports and skin reports again later this week...good luck with your bf's mom's dogs...hope they get all well soon....
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Kody Kody
I agree that a raw diet is best, however my dog hated it. There has been a lot of research on the problems caused by grain in dog food. It has been found, that among other things it causes skin problems. If you cannot give your dog a natural raw diet, try a grain free dog food.
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Kody Originally Answered: What can I do about my dogs gas?
Feed her a high quality dog food. Grocery store dog foods contain too much unnecessary fillers that have been known to cause dogs to have awful, dreadful gas. >_< Here is a site that will show you which dog foods are the best and the worst. I suggest that you get any one of the dog foods that are top rated. http://www.dogfoodanalysis.com/dog_food_reviews/ Most of grocery store dog food formulas, like IAMS, Pedigree, Science Diet, Purina,and etc contain "meat and bone meal" which has been known to contain dead dogs and cats that were euthanized in animal shelters. Their bodies are picked up and bought by the truck load by "rendering plants" , that also pick up road kill, dead live stock, and etc. They are shredded, and boiled. They skim off the fat on the top of the "soup" and collected it and sell it to pet food companies as "animal fat", the rest of the animals' remains are crushed up, dried and sold to dog and cat food companies as meat and bone meal. You can read more about it here. http://earthislandprojects.org/eijournal/fall97/fe_fall97petfood.html Here is an article where the owner of a rendering plant talks about it. He says that cremating the dead shelter animals would cause pollution, and that rendering them is good. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m5072/is_12_26/ai_115041999 Here is further information on what you shouldn't see in the ingredients list in your dog's food. http://www.dogfoodproject.com/index.php?page=badingredients Top rated dog foods like Canidae contain good healthy ingredients.

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