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Im 15 and may have an under-reactive thyroid: Why?

Im 15 and may have an under-reactive thyroid: Why? Topic: Im 15 and may have an under-reactive thyroid: Why?
April 24, 2019 / By Alyce
Question: I went to a naturopath today and they said there is problems with my thyroid, hypothyroid, but it isnt confirmed yet though i fit the symptons. Usually women over 40 get this; why am i and what can i do to help it? Thanks for any useful answer :)
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Best Answers: Im 15 and may have an under-reactive thyroid: Why?

Vern Vern | 3 days ago
I am almost 70 years old. I have been hypothyroid (low thyroid) since I was in my teens. Anyone can become low thyroid at any age, even young children! Usually it is caused by an autoimmune disease called Hashimoto's Thyroiditis. This means your body thinks your thyroid gland (which is a butterfly shaped gland in your neck) is a foreign object and your immune system tries to kill it off, making your thyroid not work right. Your thyroid is one of your "master" glands, in that it produces substances called "hormones" that every cell in your body needs for you to be healthy. If your thyroid doesn't work right, your body isn't getting the proper amount of these hormones and you will start to feel ill and have problems (like being tired, cold, dry skin, hair falling out, weight gain, depression, memory loss, etc.). Being low thyroid (hypothyroid) is a serious thing and should not be ignored. Left untreated for many years it can cause problems with your heart. So you need to treat it. Treatment is a lifelong thing. Once you are low thyroid, you will have to take your medication for the rest of your life. The way a low thyroid is diagnosed is through a simple blood test that does not hurt. Your doctor (it’s best to go to a doctor that specializes in treating thyroid problems called an “Endocrinologist”) and his lab will know what the proper range your hormone levels should be at and what is considered too low. Once diagnosed, you will be treated by being prescribed a thyroid hormone replacement. The majority of doctors prescribe Synthroid or a generic of Synthroid like Levothyroxine. You will not immediately feel better. It takes about six weeks for your body to full adjust to the medication. Your doctor will start you on a low dosage of medication and slowly work you up to a dosage that is right for you. Everyone’s body is different and some people need more or less thyroid medication. Throughout the years you will need to come in on a regular basis like every three months, or six months or once a year and have your blood test. You may have to have your thyroid medication adjusted higher or lower off and on throughout your life as your body changes with time. Although Synthroid and Levothyroxine are the standard medications for treating low thyroid, many people don't feel as well on Synthroid/Levothyroxine. That is because it only has one of the hormones your thyroid produces, called T4. The theory is that your body will convert T4 (the inactive hormone) to the active hormone T3 which is the hormone all your body's cells need to make you well. The problem with this theory is that if your thyroid isn't working right, it can't possible convert T4 to T3 so although once on Synthroid or Levothyroxine you may test your thyroid hormone levels and be in the "normal" range, but you may still have hypothyroid symptoms like feeling tired or depressed or have memory problems. The best way to solve this problem is to take a thyroid hormone replacement that has both T4 and T3 in it like a natural thyroid hormone replacement like Nature-Throid. Nature-Throid is a prescription medication and has been around since the 1930's. It is safe and effective and in my opinion works far better than Synthroid or Levothyroxine. The problem is, you may have a difficult time getting your doctor to prescribe Nature-Throid because many doctors are convinced that the dosage strength isn't as reliable as Synthroid or Levothyroxine. That is not true. Nature-Throid is tested on a regular basis by the FDA (Food and Drug Administration). Some doctors have never even heard of Nature-Throid because many medical schools only teach about Synthroid. And many insurance plans and HMO's will only cover Levothyroxine or Synthroid and not Nature-Throid, yet Nature-Throid is cheaper than both Synthroid and Levothyroxine. I highly recommend you print this out and take it to your doctor. I highly recommend you read the book, "Living Well with Hypothyroidism" by Mary J. Shomon. This book is easy to read and will really educate you on your thyroid problem. You can buy it cheap on Amazon.com or at a book store. If the book store doesn't have it, have them order it for you. Good luck honey and I hope you feel better soon.
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Vern Originally Answered: What is the best diet for Reactive Hypoglycemia, Non-Diabetic?
To relieve reactive hypoglycemia, the NIH recommends taking the following steps:-- * Eating small meals and snacks about every 3 hours; * Avoiding or limiting sugar intake; * Exercising regularly; exercise increases sugar uptake which decrease excessive insulin release * Eating a variety of foods, including meat, poultry, fish, or nonmeat sources of protein, foods such as whole-grains, fruits, vegetables, and dairy products; * Choosing high-fiber foods. Low-carbohydrate diet and/or frequent small split meals is the first treatment of this condition. The first important point is to add small meals at the middle of the morning and of the afternoon, when glycemia would start to decrease. If adequate composition of the meal is found, the fall in blood glucose is thus prevented. Patients should avoid rapidly absorbable sugars and thus avoid popular soft drinks rich in glucose or sucrose. They should also be cautious with drinks associating sugar and alcohol, mainly in the fasting state.[2]

Ronny Ronny
There really isn't any cure, but there is a natural treatment. It has been around for over 100 years and works well for the symptoms of an underactive thyroid. Here you can find more information http://treatment-hypothyroidism.keysolve.net The reason why many feel well on Armour thyroid is because it contains both T4 and T3. Many with hypothyroidism (underactive thyroid) have difficulty converting T4 to T3 and Armour has T3 in it. The most common med for the condition is Synthoid. It is made in a lab. It is a T4 medication. It is given wit the idea that the person will convert T4 into T3. Many people can convert enough, but just as many can't. That's why there are many options. If you want the natural way, try Armour thyroid or Naturethroid. For thiose with low iodine levels iodine may help, but it some cases it can make matters worse. I'd try the ARmour or Naturethroid first. I have been on Armour for 4 years and almost all symptoms are gone. It is adjusted by free t4 and free T3, not by TSH. The TSH test is a test that was developed to adjust Synthoid, not Armour and it should not be used to adjust Armour
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Moise Moise
First, I would go to a doctor to confirm a diagnosis of hypothyroidism. Having an under-active thyroid gland has many reasons. None of which are terrible. Age does usually play a part as far as what is usual and customary, however we are all individuals and not "cookie cutters" per say. Meaning, just because it usually happens in the 40's does not mean it does not in younger people. If it does turn out that this is the case, a pill or two a day will take care of it and the cause will be found. Don't fret. Everything will be just fine. I hope this has helped
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Kasper Kasper
Honey, for a start, i would not be listening to a "naturopath" or be getting a diagnosis from, him/her. Go to a doctor and get a real diagnosis. You may have many symptoms of a thyroid problem but there so many other conditions that can cause the same symptoms. I honestly don't think you have a thyroid problem especially because of your age, i know it is possible, but it is not common at all!
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Hayden Hayden
The thyroid is a butterfly-shaped gland that sits low on the front of the neck. Your thyroid lies below your Adam’s apple, along the front of the windpipe. The thyroid has two side lobes, connected by a bridge (isthmus) in the middle. When the thyroid is its normal size, you’re unlikely to be able to feel it. All types of hyperthyroidism are due to overproduction of thyroid hormones, but the condition can develop in several ways. Thyroid hormone production can be suppressed or halted completely in these ways: https://tr.im/qD8qW
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Hayden Originally Answered: C-Reactive protein elevated in blood test?
I looked this up in my Diagnotics book for nurses and this is what I found. C- reactive protein or CRP is an abnormal specific glycoprotein ( consists of carbohydrates & proteins)produced by the liver and excreted into blood. Purpose of this test - To detect the acute phase of inflammatory disease, such as exacerbations of rheumatoid arthritis and rheumatic fever. And to monitor response to therapy, especially in acute rheumatic fever and rheumatoid arthritis. The presence of CRP in serum indicates an acute inflammatory condition (tissue reaction to injury resulting from infectious or noninfectious causes). A positive test for CRP commonly occurs in bacterial infections, such as TB and pneumococcal pneumonia, and in many noninfectious inflammatory conditions, like acute rheumatic fever, acute rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, malignancy, and myocardial infarction (condition caused by acclusion of one or more of the coronary arteries) Postive CRP occurs during the last half of pregnancy and also accompanies the use of oral contraceptives, making detection of concomitant ( accessory; taking the place at the same time) inflammation difficult. I think you are right! I got all of this info right out of my diagnotics book. Make a copy and take it to him or her. Guess they didn't read their book.

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