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Please help me, my dog is scaring me!?

Please help me, my dog is scaring me!? Topic: Please help me, my dog is scaring me!?
June 25, 2019 / By Harley
Question: PLEEEAASSEE READ!! PLEASE DONT SAY ITS TOO LONG AND I WONT READ IT. Please help me, I love my dog. My German Shepherd Collie mix, Coco, I think has Cushing's Disease. Here are the symptoms, increased appetite, increased drinking and urination, panting, high blood pressure, bulging abdomen, skin lumps and discoloring, hair loss, muscle weakness, and nervous system disorders. Coco is 10 years old, and this occurs in older dogs. Her hips have been hurting her for the past year and half. She has lumps on her upper belly and hips. She has been excessively panting. I think we should take her too the vet, but last time we did, the vet said "Oh don't worry about the lumps!", and we didnt think anything of it. I really want to know if she has it, thank you! Here are more symptoms I found. (The ones that have *** is the one she has.) The most common symptoms include: • increased/excessive water consumption (polydipsia) • increased/excessive urination (polyuria) • urinary accidents in previously housetrained dogs • increased/excessive appetite (polyphagia) *** • appearance of food stealing/guarding, begging, trash dumping, etc. *** • sagging, bloated, pot-bellied appearance *** • weight gain or its appearance, due to fat redistribution *** • loss of muscle mass, giving the appearance of weight loss • bony, skull-like appearance of head • exercise intolerance, lethargy, general or hind-leg weakness • new reluctance to jump on furniture or people • excess panting, seeking cool surfaces to rest on *** • symmetrically thinning hair or baldness (alopecia) on torso • other coat changes like dullness, dryness • slow regrowth of hair after clipping • thin, wrinkled, fragile, and/or darkly pigmented skin • easily damaged/bruised skin that heals slowly • hard, calcified lumps in the skin (calcinosis cutis) *** • susceptibility to infections (especially skin and urinary) • diabetes, pancreatitis, seizures the lumps on her are under the fur, and you can't see them. it doesnt it hurt her when you touch them, and we can't take her to another vet. im going to give her glucosamine chondrotin (or however you spell it.) for her hips. because she can barely get up, and sometimes at night she cries, and we think it's her hips.
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Best Answers: Please help me, my dog is scaring me!?

Elbie Elbie | 7 days ago
Your vet is an idiot. Get a second opinion and take your dog elsewhere. Their is something wrong and to further ignore the symptoms will result in the death of your dog. Be responsible and seek help elsewhere. good luck. mx
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Elbie Originally Answered: Please help me, my dog is scaring me!?
Your vet is an idiot. Get a second opinion and take your dog elsewhere. Their is something wrong and to further ignore the symptoms will result in the death of your dog. Be responsible and seek help elsewhere. good luck. mx

Carlyle Carlyle
Calcinosis cutis usually has small lumps that are red and irritated and crunchy. Sometimes they are ulcerated. Often they are really itchy. Your dogs lumps can be anything. You won't know until you actually have a vet biopsy them. Calcinosis cutis is also incredibly rare. Here's a Google image search, to compare your dog's lumps: http://images.google.com/images?hl=en&q=... And it's also really important not to confuse the eating disorder-lke behavior of Cushings and the Cushinoid pot-belly with just general overeating and weight gain. Based on the symptoms you list, she doesn't have any signs that just jump out and scream "Cushings disease" at me - only the calcinosis cutis would be a major red flag, and you can't know she has that or just some other lumps. So here's what you should do: Ask your vet to biopsy the lumps. If he keeps telling you not to worry, go find another vet who is willing to do some tests on your dog. Tell the vet about your Cushing's disease fears. I'm sure that the vet can help ease your mind. One thing you may want to ask the vet about is a "urine cortisol-creatinine ratio." This looks for too much cortisol (stress hormone) in the urine. It's relatively inexpensive, as Cushing's tests go, and a normal result will prove that your dog does NOT have Cushings disease. A lot of vets don't like to do this test because normal dogs can frequently have high results (a high result could mean Cushings, or it could just mean your dog is stressed out.) But since it doesn't really sound to me like your dog has Cushings, I think this might be a good test to ease your fears. But you really SHOULD have the lumps checked out. They might be anything, and it's good to know whether they are just benign lipomas or something you need to have the vet remove.
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Allen Allen
Call your vet on the phone and tell him what you have found..ask him what he thinks. If he doesn't think its anything, ask him to do some bloodwork. There is a test for Cushings, and he does not have to charge for an exam...just for a blood draw and lab. If its nothing, your mind will be at ease. If it does turn out to be Cushings...you can discuss the options for treatment..or find another vet if you think this one dropped the ball. But get the test done, you won't sleep until you do! Good luck..
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Tawny Tawny
The type of dog people are trying to say is those with stable temperaments. Those that nothing phases. No snappy dog, no yippy dog, no afraid dog. There are dogs like that around. Watch dogs when they meet each other and pick the serene ones to socialize her with at first. My Shepherd is a very stable nerved dog. Very confident in every situation. Look for those dogs when you're out. Nothing ruffles their feathers, they take everything in stride. If a dog wants to start a fight with mine. He just ignores them. Tells them in a soft low growl to not be so ridiculous and amazingly they do quit. He also doesn't have to be top dog in the crowd. He doesn't care who is. He may hold that position for all I know. He also avoids a nippy dog staying just out of their reach. But letting them know that isn't acceptable behavior with that soft, low, short growl. Wish I knew what he says, I coulda used that on my kids!
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Robin Robin
How is Cushing’s syndrome treated? Treatment depends on the specific reason for excess cortisol and may include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or the use of cortisol-inhibiting drugs. If the cause is long-term use of glucocorticoid hormones to treat another disorder, the doctor will gradually reduce the dosage to the lowest dose adequate for control of that disorder. Once control is established, the daily dose of glucocorticoid hormones may be doubled and given on alternate days to lessen side effects. In some cases, nonc orticosteroid drugs can be prescribed. If transsphenoidal surgery fails or a patient is not a suitable candidate for surgery, radiation therapy is another possible treatment. Radiation to the pituitary gland is given over a 6-week period, with improvement occurring in 40 to 50 percent of adults and up to 85 percent of children. Another technique, called stereotactic radiosurgery or gamma knife radiation, can be given in a single high-dose treatment. It may take several months or years before people feel better from radiation treatment alone. Combining radiation with cortisol-inhibiting drugs can help speed recovery. Drugs used alone or in combination to control the production of excess cortisol are ketoconazole, mitotane, aminoglutethimide, and metyrapone. Each drug has its own side effects that doctors consider when prescribing medical therapy for individual patients. Cushing’s syndrome is caused by exposure to glucocorticoids, which are used to treat inflammatory diseases, or by the body’s overproduction of cortisol, most often due to tumors of the pituitary gland or lung. Several tests are usually needed to diagnosis Cushing’s syndrome, including urine, blood, and saliva tests. Other tests help find the cause of the syndrome. Treatment depends on the specific reason for excess cortisol and may include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, or the use of cortisol-inhibiting drugs. If you are really worried, take your dog to the vet and express these concerns. Maybe even mention what you think it is. This is what If you are really worried, take your dog to the vet and express these concerns. Maybe even mention what you think it is. What you don't want to do is guess and assume what your dog has. Self diagnosing in any form is not helpful, I assume you are not a qualified vet.
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Modesty Modesty
I suggest taking coco back to the vet. Lumps on the skin can be all sorts of things (warts, allergies, lipoma -fatty lumps usually found on middle aged females-, etc, see http://www.dog-health-guide.org/doglumpsonskin.html for more), but if these other symptoms have come about since then it would be wise to take her back. Also if you don't trust your current vet, you could try taking her to a new one to get a different opinion.
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Modesty Originally Answered: Help me please? My diet is scaring me, I need advice?
Fasting will help you. It just depends on the will power that you have. Sometimes we fast and then we slip up and eat, and now we are beating our self up, because it seems as if we have failed. Not at all, but if you are eating right, and you are doing some time of exercise, at least 45 minutes to an hour continuously, then try to reduce calories, make lunch, your heaviest meal, eat breakfast like 2 boiled eggs and some whole wheat toast to help jump start your metabolism, eat a healthy snack in between meals, and don't eat after 7pm, if possible. Also, try and use a body cleanse of some type, here is one I recommend http://mhlnk.com/E578E8C6. Have a great day, and feel great!!

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