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Why should we brush our teeth and use toothpaste? Is there better alternative?

Why should we brush our teeth and use toothpaste? Is there better alternative? Topic: Why should we brush our teeth and use toothpaste? Is there better alternative?
June 16, 2019 / By Oonagh
Question: Early people, despite of not knowing toothpaste, had better teeth than us now. Many companies boast their products for being the best toothpaste in tooth care. Does that really happened? As I learned in Science, flouride cannot be dissolved by any part of our body from outside. In another word, it is taken in through food. Brushing can act as abbrassive. Therefore somehow, sometimes resulting in cavity. Unpleasant breath may be relieved. But lasting in no time. What I meant was that we knew cavity is cause by by-products of amoeba in our saliva. But brushing our teeth with toothbrush made of bristle plastic which its points are not polished or rounded can act a sandpaper to the enamel. And certain toothpaste has pH value and ingredients of different for everybody. How could they choose the right one? Most people care less about pH value. Only its floral scent.
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Best Answers: Why should we brush our teeth and use toothpaste? Is there better alternative?

Maggie Maggie | 1 day ago
Here is my attempt to answer if you have an open mind. You are correct that early people had less decay...but...they also didn't have the processed food we have now. Think about it these early people ate cooked sometimes raw meat vegetables and water. They weren't drinking soda, eating hamburgers or other items we have today. Decay thrives off of a high surgar diet which didn't exist in early man. However they did get decay and there is evidence that several of the egyptian mummies suffered from severe dental infections from decay. Not to mention that the lifespan of man has increased considerably since these early peoples. As for flouride, its only act in dental history is that it strengthens enamel...flouride itself isn't an abbrasive. The paste it comes in can be and if you are brushing wrong you can indeed cause problems for teeth especially around the cemento-enamel juction (where your enamel meets the root {this is where the enamel is thinnest and therefore most likely to wear}) Alas, like anything and I mean ANYthing, too much of flouride can be very bad and even lethal. It was used as rat poison not too long ago. But, what the same scientists have discovered is that in small amounts it incorporates itself in to the tooth structure making it more resistant to acid. Why is that important...well...decay isn't caused directly from bacteria but rather from the acidic by-product of bacterias use of surgar. A simple way to look at it is you eat surgar, bacteria in your mouth eat that surgar too...produce an acid and that acid breaks down your tooth causing a hole. Fluoride makes your teeth more resistant to the acid. That is all it does. The paste the fluoride comes in is just a delivery system. Pastes are used because it helps remove plaque which is also essential for decay to occur. Finally I have never seen or heard of anyone who has decay from brushing his/her teeth. Hope this helps and Opens your mind
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Maggie Originally Answered: Why should we brush our teeth and use toothpaste? Is there better alternative?
Here is my attempt to answer if you have an open mind. You are correct that early people had less decay...but...they also didn't have the processed food we have now. Think about it these early people ate cooked sometimes raw meat vegetables and water. They weren't drinking soda, eating hamburgers or other items we have today. Decay thrives off of a high surgar diet which didn't exist in early man. However they did get decay and there is evidence that several of the egyptian mummies suffered from severe dental infections from decay. Not to mention that the lifespan of man has increased considerably since these early peoples. As for flouride, its only act in dental history is that it strengthens enamel...flouride itself isn't an abbrasive. The paste it comes in can be and if you are brushing wrong you can indeed cause problems for teeth especially around the cemento-enamel juction (where your enamel meets the root {this is where the enamel is thinnest and therefore most likely to wear}) Alas, like anything and I mean ANYthing, too much of flouride can be very bad and even lethal. It was used as rat poison not too long ago. But, what the same scientists have discovered is that in small amounts it incorporates itself in to the tooth structure making it more resistant to acid. Why is that important...well...decay isn't caused directly from bacteria but rather from the acidic by-product of bacterias use of surgar. A simple way to look at it is you eat surgar, bacteria in your mouth eat that surgar too...produce an acid and that acid breaks down your tooth causing a hole. Fluoride makes your teeth more resistant to the acid. That is all it does. The paste the fluoride comes in is just a delivery system. Pastes are used because it helps remove plaque which is also essential for decay to occur. Finally I have never seen or heard of anyone who has decay from brushing his/her teeth. Hope this helps and Opens your mind

Keshia Keshia
early people didn't have to worry about sugar now there is sugar in everything, as for the toothpaste u dont really need it but u do have to brush off the bacteria on your teeth that is what cause cavities or dental caries. brushing is not abrasive if u use a soft toothbrush hope i could help
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Jadyn Jadyn
It doesn't matter what's on the brush but what's on the handle. And fluoride is absorbed from the outside...not as much but it is. Most tooth pastes are the same.
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Emiline Emiline
Baking soda does just as good a job. also dip your brush in antiseptic mouth wash & brush,helps a lot too.
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Emiline Originally Answered: How do I stop losing my hair. it's so fine and thinning and it falls out everytime I brush or shampoo it.?
I posted some information you might find helpful below. Personally, I've listed the shampoo products that have helped. Check out the information below specifically for women. ================== Craving a full head of hair? It is not unusual for women to experience hair loss as they age, especially when menopausal changes come into play. Thinning hair (also known as female pattern baldness) can be due to the effects of hair-care treatments, dyes, and styling; the habit of twisting or pulling your hair; or even thyroid disease. Diet may also play a role. To maintain healthy hair and help prevent further loss, try these two simple changes: 1. Make sure you're getting enough omega-3 fatty acids. Eat wild Alaskan salmon, sardines, herring or mackerel two or three times a week, or sprinkle two tablespoons of freshly ground flaxseeds per day on cereal or salads. You can also supplement with a high-quality fish oil. 2. Supplement your diet with GLA (gamma-linolenic acid) in the form of black currant oil or evening primrose oil. Take 500 mg of either twice a day for six to eight weeks to see if it helps.

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