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I've started on the vegetarian road last week, and I wanted to know what special stuff I should take?

I've started on the vegetarian road last week, and I wanted to know what special stuff I should take? Topic: I've started on the vegetarian road last week, and I wanted to know what special stuff I should take?
June 20, 2019 / By Ace
Question: I know some people say it's dangerous, so I wanted to know what type of vitamins I should take, and any precautions I should take? I know I won't get the same amount of protein by eating meat, but I don't wanna stay healthy due to the slaughter of animals
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Best Answers: I've started on the vegetarian road last week, and I wanted to know what special stuff I should take?

Sonora Sonora | 4 days ago
People can have a have a hard time excepting that the vegetarian lifestyle can be healthy.. but it IS! What special stuff should you should take? Well, if you're doing it right, virtually nothing! Multivitamins are actually often not that beneficial - as they contain vitamins which can counteract each-others absorption and so you don't end up getting that much out of them! The key thing to being vegetarian is variety - a range of vegetables, fruit, dried fruit and nuts - potato is not meat, but you can't live off mashed potato, although I've notcied a lot of omnivores attempting to (along with peas and sausages, which doesn't really increase the nutritional value that much!). Some of the things which non-vegetarians harp on about are iron and protein - If you're still eating dairy products, milk, eggs.. well, they've all got protein! But nuts, corn, beans etc are good sources as well! And iron can be found in lentils, egg yolks, dried beans, dried peas, currants, almonds, spinach, dates, raisins, figs, prunes, chocolate, green peas, peanuts, broccoli... (that list goes from most-iron rich at the start to those which are still sources of iron but not as good at the end.) I have been vegetarian all my life, and am a fit healthy 20yr old uni student (with good grades) - my bmi is perfect, as are all those things like cholesterol, blood pressure etc - I know this because I get checked every 6 months when I need a repeat for the contraceptive pill... If you eat like a vegetarian, and not like an omnivore-minus-the-meat, the vegetarian lifestyle is incredibly healthy and not at all dangerous. The things I WOULD recommend - as a woman, iron can get low (vegetarian or not - due to good old menstruation - but as a vegetarian you may need to actively make sure you're eating enough iron-rich foods) - so if you find yourself feeling really run down and tired, you may want to get a blood test to check your iron levels. Vitamin C aids the absorption of iron, so if you DO need to take iron supplements (you can get them over the counter but I would recommend a test first because too much iron can be incredibly dangerous to your health and some people DO suffer from iron overload (http://www.ironoverload.org/facts.html)) - it may pay to take them with a glass of orange juice or an orange or mandarin or something, or just make sure you're getting enough vitamin C in your diet generally. B12 is something that can be risky apparently - I've never been low on it myself though. Yeast is a good source of it, if you want to take supplements of any sort I suppose B12 would be the one, though I've personally never had to. 'Flaxseed oil' - like a tablespoon or teaspoon or something a day - is supposed to be a really good supplement to any diet - I've never tried that either, it's pretty expensive I think, but it's recommended for all people, veggo or not. Here are some links which also may be of use: http://www.vrg.org/ http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4777 http://www.vegsoc.org.nz/v2_fctsht_nutri_gen.html http://www.vegansociety.com/html/ Best of luck :)
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Sonora Originally Answered: I've started on the vegetarian road last week, and I wanted to know what special stuff I should take?
People can have a have a hard time excepting that the vegetarian lifestyle can be healthy.. but it IS! What special stuff should you should take? Well, if you're doing it right, virtually nothing! Multivitamins are actually often not that beneficial - as they contain vitamins which can counteract each-others absorption and so you don't end up getting that much out of them! The key thing to being vegetarian is variety - a range of vegetables, fruit, dried fruit and nuts - potato is not meat, but you can't live off mashed potato, although I've notcied a lot of omnivores attempting to (along with peas and sausages, which doesn't really increase the nutritional value that much!). Some of the things which non-vegetarians harp on about are iron and protein - If you're still eating dairy products, milk, eggs.. well, they've all got protein! But nuts, corn, beans etc are good sources as well! And iron can be found in lentils, egg yolks, dried beans, dried peas, currants, almonds, spinach, dates, raisins, figs, prunes, chocolate, green peas, peanuts, broccoli... (that list goes from most-iron rich at the start to those which are still sources of iron but not as good at the end.) I have been vegetarian all my life, and am a fit healthy 20yr old uni student (with good grades) - my bmi is perfect, as are all those things like cholesterol, blood pressure etc - I know this because I get checked every 6 months when I need a repeat for the contraceptive pill... If you eat like a vegetarian, and not like an omnivore-minus-the-meat, the vegetarian lifestyle is incredibly healthy and not at all dangerous. The things I WOULD recommend - as a woman, iron can get low (vegetarian or not - due to good old menstruation - but as a vegetarian you may need to actively make sure you're eating enough iron-rich foods) - so if you find yourself feeling really run down and tired, you may want to get a blood test to check your iron levels. Vitamin C aids the absorption of iron, so if you DO need to take iron supplements (you can get them over the counter but I would recommend a test first because too much iron can be incredibly dangerous to your health and some people DO suffer from iron overload (http://www.ironoverload.org/facts.html)) - it may pay to take them with a glass of orange juice or an orange or mandarin or something, or just make sure you're getting enough vitamin C in your diet generally. B12 is something that can be risky apparently - I've never been low on it myself though. Yeast is a good source of it, if you want to take supplements of any sort I suppose B12 would be the one, though I've personally never had to. 'Flaxseed oil' - like a tablespoon or teaspoon or something a day - is supposed to be a really good supplement to any diet - I've never tried that either, it's pretty expensive I think, but it's recommended for all people, veggo or not. Here are some links which also may be of use: http://www.vrg.org/ http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4777 http://www.vegsoc.org.nz/v2_fctsht_nutri_gen.html http://www.vegansociety.com/html/ Best of luck :)

Portia Portia
Please don't listen to the people who say you have to eat meat. That is a complete myth and has been disproved years ago. Those people are still living in ignorant bliss. A vegetarian diet is far healthier and the research is there to prove it - less cancer risk, less heart attack risk, less obesity , less IBS - youb get the idea. Contrary to ideas about protein, it isn't necessary to get it from meat, and you dont actually need as much protein as you'd think. Most people consume far too much and end up with health problems as a result. In a vegetarian diet yu can get protein from beans, lentils, grains, nuts, seeds, chickpeas, and eggs(if you eat them). Soya beans and the quinoa grain are both complete proteins like meat, but it doesnt matter about eating complete proteins at every meal as your body will take care of itself naturally as long as you're eating a well balanced diet. You've got loads of choices for recipes if you check out the internet and also get hold of a goof diet book. Don't be swayed by the meat brigade - all the need to do is research it themselves to find out the true facts - they're in denial. You're eating the best way possible for your health, for the animals and the planet which is great.
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Mauld Mauld
It amazes me how lacking in knowledge some people are... and how anxious they are to share their ignorance. Even the mainstream media now comes out strongly in favor of a vegetarian diet for many health reasons. Sure, you need to choose healthy balanced food--- but you omnivores should do that too. If you become a vegan (no dairy food at all) there is a chance you could lack one of the B vitamins. Many vegans either take a vitamin supplement or add a bit of nutritional yeast to their diets. Get on the Internet and do a little research. Or check out a vegetarian cookbook for meal suggestions etc. I've been veg for over 30 years---my mother said I'd die without meat! I'm 10 x's as healthy as she was at my age and I raised seven healthy kids, too. Even as adults, they've chosen to not eat meat, fish or eggs. Now I have 5 healthy energetic and robust grand kids who are also vegetarian. Don't listen to fools who spit out their fact-free opinions.
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Latasha Latasha
"Contrary to what Michelle118 would like you to believe, I'd bet the fat lady and the farm that she's NOT fine. It's not possible to get complete protein nutrition without eating any kind of meat. " And who's fatlady that you just lost in this ill advised, undereducated bet? Andie is either outright lying or is seriously undereducated. It's 100% possible to get "complete protein nutrition" without eating any kind of meat. If it weren't, wouldn't all vegetarians be dead several weeks into their conversion? Wouldn't people like Stella McCartney and Joaquin Phoenix not have seen their 1st birthday? Americans currently get at least 3 times the amount of protein recommended by the FDA. As long as a vegetarian eats a well-balanced diet, protein is not an issue. Sorry Andie, but it's time to start learning rather than preaching incorrect and well disputed facts. "Getting enough protein on a true vegetarian diet, by eating no meat at all, is not possible. Abandon the idea and go back to being healthy! " And Demon Doll is obviously being taught by a demon - someone or something that wishes to corrupt. A True vegetarian diet can easily supply enough protein. Again, if it didn't, vegetarians simply wouldn't survive. Another myth of the undereducated morons. As far as being healthy - does Alicia Silverstone look unhealthy? How about Natalie Portman? Maybe Alec Baldwin? How bout Daryl Hannah, Josh Hartnett, or Alyssa Milano? Just to clarify Kristina's comment on Carl Lewis - he's actually vegan when he trains, I don't know about being full time veggie. Precautions to take - read up on vegetarian nutrition. Vegetarian does not mean French Fries, Cheese Pizza, and Taco Bell Burritos. It means a well-balanced diet full of vegetables, grains, fruits, legumes, and other plant based nutrients. Cheese, dairy, eggs, and other similar ingredients are fine on a limited basis. I'll give you a few links to help you out. Remember that meat by-products live in odd locations. Yogurt frequently contains gelatin (cow bones), make-ups frequently contain carmine (bug carcasses), soups often contain beef or chicken stocks, etc. Don't beat yourself up if you regress every once in awhile for the first couple years. Everyone has their 'craving', but they do eventually do go away. And soy foods are so good now that often cravings can be met by using 'fake' meats in recipes. Good luck in this!
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Jessica Jessica
You can get your complex proteins by combining two of the three groups of either grains, beans, or nuts in a meal. Soy protein, such as tofu, tempeh, or seitan is also another good alternative to meat protein, but since you are not a vegan and a vegetarian you have more options and can also get your proteins from dairy derived products such as milk, cheese, or yogurt.
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Jessica Originally Answered: Road trip from Austin, TX to Sacramento, CA?
Everyone always says there is nothing to do in Sacramento, but there are actually quite a few options.. If you are into gambling there is Thunder Valley Casino in Lincoln, CA which is close to sac, and Red Hawk Casino a little past Folsom, CA. There is an old fashioned movie theater in downtown sac called Crest theater, never been but I would like to someday. There's Downtown plaza, also downtown, it's an open roofed mall, pretty cool, and it's in walking distance to old Sacramento, where there are all the old fashioned buildings and shops. Also the Sacramento River, you can have a picnic or just walk along the trail. Arden Mall is a pretty big mall on Arden way. You can always check out Elk Grove city which borders Sac, has a bunch of restaurants and shopping centers, and a new bowling alley In roseville CA there is a cool resturant called 'John's Incredible Pizza Company' it's awesome, fun for all ages, it's a pizza buffet with all different types of pizza's, and they have a humoungus arcade room with a full sized ride and really new arcade games. All of these places are within 30-45 minutes of each other. what ever you do try to stay away from Mack Rd and Florin Rd areas, it's kind of ghetto. lol

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