4696 Shares

Any serval experts out there?

Any serval experts out there? Topic: Any serval experts out there?
June 20, 2019 / By Abigayle
Question: so i'm thinking about getting a serval eventually, and i'm wondering how you housebreak them, do they use a litter box or do you take them for walks? do you have to keep them inside so your neighbors dont freak out and call animal control? are they mostly cuddly like cats or playful like dogs? what do they eat? what if they get too aggressive? do you have to have a certain amount of back yard space?
Best Answer

Best Answers: Any serval experts out there?

Stu Stu | 9 days ago
Hi Kate....Servals or any wild exotic cat require a lot of time, attention, care, management as they cannot eat ordinary cat food ONLY a raw diet w/vitamin supplementations or they will die from malnutrition, which happens so frequently with new pet owners. Servals or any exotic cat will only bond with one or two people at most therefore, would you be willing to commit 20+ years of your life for the sake of the exotic cats lifetime? You truly CANNOT go out a lot or take vacations or the cat will never forgive you while you're away as it will starve itself to death since it will only trust no one but you to feed it. Will you be able to afford to feed it the diet it requires and meet the legal requirements since you'll have to be inspected annually by the government ...or will you decide you can give it away because it becomes too much of a financial and emotional burden? Exotic cats should never be rehomed as it will ultimately be a death sentence to them. They bond with essential one or two people and if those persons no longer exist anymore servals may starve themselves to death. Exotic cats DO NOT get along with other pets and will kill any smaller domestic house pet that enters their territory even if they were raised together as youngsters. As they reach sexual maturity (even spayed/neutered) they will kill domestic animals. Most exotic cats are solitary by nature, which is why. Therefore, anyone telling you this is not being honest and this such a hearbreak to discover this first hand as many people do. Here you will find some guidelines to owning an exotic cat. Please don't be fooled into believing that it will be any less work that having children! It is not for everyone. Don't make the mistake of believing that if you can't endure for the lifetime of your cat, you will be able to place it at a zoo or a wildlife rescue. This misconception is what gets a lot of exotic animals euthanised immediately because they are very hard to place. Zoos are full to capacity and also have strict requirements on the animals that they acquire for studbook breeding purposes and AZA (American Zoos and Aquariums Association) regulations. Compounds like Wild About Cats, Big Cat Rescue have to rescue some, but there are simply not enough sanctuaries for them all. Therefore, taking into consideration that many people are determined to get a cat no matter what they are told, and that many people are capable of being responsible owners, we always advise on captive husbandry. We would rather that these people were educated properly on care and handling, rather than dictated to that what they are doing is wrong. This is for the sake of the cats that did not ask to be born into these situations. If after reading through this information you would like to know more about captive wild cat husbandry and whether or not it is for you. For complete details please consider reading the full information provided below: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;... Consider joining Phoenix Exotics Wildlife Assoc http://phoenixexotics.org/ who is a group of private owners from all across America which includes individuals, sanctuaries and breeders. We are an organization of active members working to protect and maintain the rights of private ownership through responsible behavior.
👍 146 | 👎 9
Did you like the answer? Any serval experts out there? Share with your friends
Stu Originally Answered: Any serval experts out there?
Hi Kate....Servals or any wild exotic cat require a lot of time, attention, care, management as they cannot eat ordinary cat food ONLY a raw diet w/vitamin supplementations or they will die from malnutrition, which happens so frequently with new pet owners. Servals or any exotic cat will only bond with one or two people at most therefore, would you be willing to commit 20+ years of your life for the sake of the exotic cats lifetime? You truly CANNOT go out a lot or take vacations or the cat will never forgive you while you're away as it will starve itself to death since it will only trust no one but you to feed it. Will you be able to afford to feed it the diet it requires and meet the legal requirements since you'll have to be inspected annually by the government ...or will you decide you can give it away because it becomes too much of a financial and emotional burden? Exotic cats should never be rehomed as it will ultimately be a death sentence to them. They bond with essential one or two people and if those persons no longer exist anymore servals may starve themselves to death. Exotic cats DO NOT get along with other pets and will kill any smaller domestic house pet that enters their territory even if they were raised together as youngsters. As they reach sexual maturity (even spayed/neutered) they will kill domestic animals. Most exotic cats are solitary by nature, which is why. Therefore, anyone telling you this is not being honest and this such a hearbreak to discover this first hand as many people do. Here you will find some guidelines to owning an exotic cat. Please don't be fooled into believing that it will be any less work that having children! It is not for everyone. Don't make the mistake of believing that if you can't endure for the lifetime of your cat, you will be able to place it at a zoo or a wildlife rescue. This misconception is what gets a lot of exotic animals euthanised immediately because they are very hard to place. Zoos are full to capacity and also have strict requirements on the animals that they acquire for studbook breeding purposes and AZA (American Zoos and Aquariums Association) regulations. Compounds like Wild About Cats, Big Cat Rescue have to rescue some, but there are simply not enough sanctuaries for them all. Therefore, taking into consideration that many people are determined to get a cat no matter what they are told, and that many people are capable of being responsible owners, we always advise on captive husbandry. We would rather that these people were educated properly on care and handling, rather than dictated to that what they are doing is wrong. This is for the sake of the cats that did not ask to be born into these situations. If after reading through this information you would like to know more about captive wild cat husbandry and whether or not it is for you. For complete details please consider reading the full information provided below: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index;... Consider joining Phoenix Exotics Wildlife Assoc http://phoenixexotics.org/ who is a group of private owners from all across America which includes individuals, sanctuaries and breeders. We are an organization of active members working to protect and maintain the rights of private ownership through responsible behavior.

Pancras Pancras
Servals are truly a wild animal which cannot be kept easily as a house pet except when they are kittens. But as like all young animals they do grow up. Servals can learn to use a litter box, but when they reach about 2-3 years of age (even fixed), they always urinate anywhere to mark territory and there's no way to train out this instinctual behavior. They can NEVER be brought out in public even on leash or your cat could be subject to immediate confiscation and whatever the animal control agency who captures and holds deems necessary--euthanasia. All exotics require an outdoor enclosure that will be subject drop (surprise and unannounced) inspections by the local governing agency (USDA/APHIS in the USA) or other agencies in other countries. Each region (e.g. town/city/county/federal) also have their own legal requirements. All exotics require a license or a permit to keep the animal on the premise so long as you agree to drop inspections and show the cat has been see by an exotic veterinarian which will document what has been examined and vaccinated, etc. They are not cuddly animals nor playful in the sense dogs are. They truly bite hard and can cause severe injury with their large canine teeth. They must eat a raw diet that is supplemented with special vitamins a supplier can recommend since all exotic cats suffer from life-threatening ailments when held in captivity. Aggression is a given with any exotic cats. Ask any zookeeper and they will help educate you why these don't make good pets. Perhaps you could consider adopting a Bengal, Savannah breed. They have the looks of the two wild exotics, but with the temperament of the domestic breeds. Be sure that they are 4 or more generations removed from the wild cat or they also will be subject to the same laws for 100% exotics as well.
👍 50 | 👎 8

Livy Livy
Wild animals don't make good pets. That goes double for carnivores (servals eat nothing but meat) and triple for cats. With the exception of Lions and the house cat, all cats are loners. They don't like roomates. Anyone or anything in their space is considered food or an enemy to be fought to the death. (Yours, not the serval's). Even ones raised by humans will eventually turn on their "families". Keeping wildlife in a private home requires plenty of permits, training, and expensive equipment. It's not about having enough space, or the right food. Caging wildlife should be left to experts. Volunteer at a zoo. Get some experience, learn the realities of captivity. Because, there's no place to take them if you can't handle them anymore. Zoos won't take them, animal control doesn't have the facilities and will kill them on site. Rescues are full to bursting with wildlife that people got and couldn't deal with. You could very well kill a beautiful animal, just because you wanted it as a pet. People are working to breed house cats to look "wild". They are a sensible, humane alternative, that will actually be affectionate and fun to be around. You won't have to worry about it mauling the neighbors either. Hold on, I'll get you links. http://www.junglecats.com/welcome_to_jewels_of_the_nile.htm http://www.bengal-cat.net/ http://toygers.org/eeyaa/ http://catiators.ocicat.com/cats.htm http://www.abyssinians.ca/boys.htm I hope this helps
👍 42 | 👎 7

Jashub Jashub
Actually, most of the DO have good meanings. Frequently, it is easier to list the ones that don't, such as Scalopus aquaticus, a mole that is not aquatic. The collector found the first one dead in a puddle and nobody knew any better. The names are treated as if they were Latin. Most come from either Latin or Greek but they can come from any language or from none at all. For example Thea (tea) comes from Chinese. Kogia (a small whale) is a pun on the English "codger". Tiktaalik is Esquimoan. Patronymics are named after a person and are not from any language (or from all of them, depending on your point of view). My favorite is the DeKay's snake from the Midwest, Storeria dekayi wrightorum, named after three zoologists, Storer, DeKay, and Write.
👍 34 | 👎 6

Gabby Gabby
No matter what you do, including altering your serval, they will continue to spray in your house. It's not ideal for the serval, but they do make great pets. So if you can get the proper permits, and don't mind a cat peeing all over your house, then go for it.
👍 26 | 👎 5

Den Den
I have personal experience with about 6 of them at a persons home, they're great at kids but once they hit about almost 6months they're agrressive and will bite megahard play rough. They are like chimpanzees, at an older age they tend to distemper, and get like some older dogs, its kinda weird because they arent commonly house tamed or domestic and those natural uncontrollable insticts are still there. Honestly fennec foxes are a beter choice if you HAVE to have something special, but honesylu its not a smart choice for a serval, you culd never recreate its natural inviroment, also they spray pretty heavily and DO NOT belong indoors.
👍 18 | 👎 4

Beau Beau
If you are truly interested in exotic pet ownership then I invite you to visit my Yahoo group called "You Have A What?". There are people there that own everything from birds to kangaroos, to monkeys, to tigers. http://pets.groups.yahoo.com/group/you-have-a-what/ There are several serval owners/breeders there that would love to help you. Here are some other sites that may be of interest to you: http://www.exoticcatz.com http://www.felineconservation.org http://www.rexano.org
👍 10 | 👎 3

Beau Originally Answered: Calling all Holland Lop rabbit experts!?
Congrats on getting a bunny =) they make wonderful pets for the right people. The average lifespan is 8-10 years some live longer it depends on things like care and genetics Low protein and high fiber foods always. Look at the ingredients on the bag nothing with colorful pieces and no nuts, fruit, cereals or seeds mixed in. I recommend Oxbow, Zupreem, American Pet Diner or Sweet Meadow Farms. Lots and lots of hay it should be the majority of her diet. The more hay you can get her to eat the better. Never bath it is dangerous (stress, heart attack and the possibility of hypothermia if not dried properly). Rabbits will keep themselves clean if they are not ill. There is no way to prevent shedding but you can make it manageable by brushing regularly. I use http://www.walmart.com/ip/FurBuster-Cat-... and http://store.binkybunny.com/hairbuster-p... neither have caused my rabbits pain they usually loaf out and go to sleep. Toys I make most of my toys especially with cardboard boxes those are a rabbit favorite. Baby key rings (just make sure she doesn't chew them), jingle cat balls, stuffed toys to throw around, etc. It really isn't hard to entertain them. Lots of cheap toys http://store.binkybunny.com/toys-c2.aspx Homemade toys (my rabbits favorite is the 'jellyfish') http://www.binkybunny.com/BUNNYINFO/ToyTest/ArchivedToyTests/tabid/126/Default.aspx http://www.binkybunny.com/BUNNYINFO/ToyTest/tabid/65/Default.aspx They can definitely be litter trained. If you get her spayed it will make it a lot easier and more efficient. It can be quick or it can take awhile. My first rabbit was litter box trained in 3 days my youngest rabbit (unaltered due to health for now) is still having issues. It is really helpful if you put the hay so that the rabbit has no choice but to sit in the litter box while eating it since they like to eat and poo at the same time. I start out with a smaller cage or pen big enough for a litterbox hay rack food and water bowl hide box and a place to stretch out. Once he/she has mastered that area I expand it a little until eventually I can leave the rabbit out to play for longer periods of time and they go back to the litter box. This guide helped me a lot http://www.rabbit.org/faq/sections/litter.html Make sure you use a rabbit safe litter no pine (unless kiln dried pellets like Feline pine or Equine Pine) and no cedar. I use Equine Pine and wood stove pellets (no accelerant). Do not freak out if your sweet baby becomes grumpy and un-litter box trained at around 12 weeks old. That is when rabbits hormones kick in and some can get pretty aggressive during this time. This is a prime time to have the rabbit spayed/neutered to curb any bad behaviors before they become a habit. Do a ton of research http://www.rabbit.org http://www.binkybunny.com Above all enjoy your rabbit.

If you have your own answer to the question Any serval experts out there?, then you can write your own version, using the form below for an extended answer.